Jump to content

Get Rec’d with Amanda – Volume 23


Recommended Posts

Hey all! It’s a very sleepy edition of Get Rec’d, as in I’m very sleepy while writing this list.

For those who don’t know, I talk about books a lot in my daily life outside of SBTB. I work at a bookstore and give professional book recs through Book Riot’s TBR subscription. I personally love playing book matchmaker, and I love it when people give me recs as well!

Get any good recommendations lately? Tell me all about them!

I Dream of Dinner (So You Don’t Have To)

B093YRHCST.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

Sarah recommended this one to me on a recent podcast episode! I pulled it off the shelf at the bookstore to peruse and a coworker also said it’s a great cookbook.

150 essential recipes for dinner on the fly, from New York Times contributor Ali Slagle

With minimal ingredients and maximum joy in mind, Ali Slagle’s no-nonsense, completely delicious recipes are ideal for dinner tonight–and every single night. Like she does with her instantly beloved recipes in the New York Times, Ali combines readily available, inexpensive ingredients in clever, uncomplicated ways for meals that spark everyday magic. Maybe it’s Fish & Chips Tacos tonight, a bowl of Olive Oil-Braised Chickpeas tomorrow, and Farro Carbonara forever and ever. All come together with fewer than eight ingredients and forty-five minutes, using one or two pots and pans. Half the recipes are plant-based, too.

Organized by main ingredients like eggs, noodles, beans, and chicken, chapters include quick tricks for riffable cooking methods and flavor combinations so that dinner bends to your life, not the other way around (no meal-planning required!). Whether in need of comfort and calm, fire and fun–directions to cling to, or the inspiration to wing it–Dinnertime is the only phone-a-friend you need. That’s because Ali, a home cook turned recipe developer, guides with a reassuring calm, puckish curiosity, and desire for everyone, everywhere, to make great food–and fast. (Phew!)

Add to Goodreads To-Read List →

You can find ordering info for this book here.

 

 

 

Inventing the It Girl

B09KMGJDBC.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

This one was another recommendation from someone else. SBTB reader Susan sent this to my inbox and felt it would be of interest in the Bitchery, and I definitely agree.

The modern romance novel is elevated to a subject of serious study in this addictive biography of pioneering celebrity author Elinor Glyn.

Unlike typical romances, which end with wedding bells, Elinor Glyn’s story really began after her marriage up the social ladder and into the English gentry class in 1892. Born in the Channel Islands, Elinor Sutherland, like most Victorian women, aspired only to a good match. But when her husband, Clayton Glyn, gambled their fortune away, she turned to her pen and boldly challenged the era’s sexually straightjacketed literary code with her notorious succes de scandale, Three Weeks. An intensely erotic tale about an unhappily married woman’s sexual education of her young lover, the novel got Glyn banished from high society but went on to sell millions, revealing a deep yearning for a fuller account of sexual passion than permitted by the British aristocracy or the Anglo-American literary establishment.

In elegant prose, Hilary A. Hallett traces Glyn’s meteoric rise from a depressed society darling to a world-renowned celebrity author who consorted with world leaders from St. Petersburg to Cairo to New York. After reporting from the trenches during World War I, the author was lured by American movie producers from Paris to Los Angeles for her remarkable third act. Weaving together years of deep archival research, Hallett movingly conveys how Glyn, more than any other individual during the Roaring Twenties, crafted early Hollywood’s glamorous romantic aesthetic. She taught the screen’s greatest leading men to make love in ways that set audiences aflame, and coined the term It Girl, which turned actress Clara Bow into the symbol of the first sexual revolution.

With Inventing the It Girl, Hallett has done nothing less than elevate the origins of the modern romance genre to a subject of serious study. In doing so, she has also reclaimed the enormous influence of one of Anglo-America’s most significant cultural tastemakers while revealing Glyn’s life to have been as sensational as any of the characters she created on the page or screen. The result is a groundbreaking portrait of a courageous icon of independence who encouraged future generations to chase their desires wherever they might lead.

Add to Goodreads To-Read List →

You can find ordering info for this book here.

 

 

 

Nobody Hugs a Cactus

B07GNTMNBQ.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

I love a grumpy character in my reading, no matter the genre. So a grumpy cactus who secretly wants all the love and affection was just too cute.

Celebrated artist and lead character designer of Brave, Ratatouille, and Despicable Me, Carter Goodrich, shows that sometimes, even the prickliest people—or the crankiest cacti—need a little love.

Hank is the prickliest cactus in the entire world. He sits in a pot in a window that faces the empty desert, which is just how he likes it. So, when all manner of creatures—from tumbleweed to lizard to owl—come to disturb his peace, Hank is annoyed.

He doesn’t like noise, he doesn’t like rowdiness, and definitely does not like hugs.

But the thing is, no one is offering one. Who would want to hug a plant so mean? Hank is beginning to discover that being alone can be, well, lonely.

So he comes up with a plan to get the one thing he thought he would never need: a hug from a friend.

Add to Goodreads To-Read List →

You can find ordering info for this book here.

 

 

 

Smoke Gets in Your Eyes

B00J8R3MYW.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

Caitlin Doughty is one of my favorite non-fiction authors to recommend, especially for people who have enjoyed Mary Roach and don’t mind more macabre topics.

A young mortician goes behind the scenes, unafraid of the gruesome (and fascinating) details of her curious profession.

Most people want to avoid thinking about death, but Caitlin Doughty—a twenty-something with a degree in medieval history and a flair for the macabre—took a job at a crematory, turning morbid curiosity into her life’s work. With an original voice that combines fearless curiosity and mordant wit, Caitlin tells an unusual coming-of-age story full of bizarre encounters, gallows humor, and vivid characters (both living and very dead). Describing how she swept ashes from the machines (and sometimes onto her clothes), and cared for bodies of all shapes and sizes, Caitlin becomes an intrepid explorer in the world of the deceased. Her eye-opening memoir shows how our fear of dying warps our culture and society, and she calls for better ways of dealing with death (and our dead). In the spirit of her popular Web series, “Ask a Mortician,” Caitlin’s engaging narrative style makes this otherwise scary topic both approachable and profound.

Add to Goodreads To-Read List →

You can find ordering info for this book here.

 

 

 

View the full article

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 0
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Days

Top Posters In This Topic

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share












ALGONKIAN SUCCESS STORIES



WTF is Wrong With Stephen King?















×
×
  • Create New...